Journalism – Agri Turismo Denderacchi http://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 06:08:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-agriturismo-32x32.png Journalism – Agri Turismo Denderacchi http://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/ 32 32 ESPN sports reporter discusses sporting events at conference // The Observer https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/espn-sports-reporter-discusses-sporting-events-at-conference-the-observer/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 04:08:15 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/espn-sports-reporter-discusses-sporting-events-at-conference-the-observer/ The Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights hosted sports reporter Howard Bryant, who spoke about the legacy of sporting events for his online lecture series, “Building an anti-racist vocabulary” to Friday. Sports reporter Howard Bryant spoke about the role of political protests in historical and contemporary sports at a conference sponsored by the Klau […]]]>

The Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights hosted sports reporter Howard Bryant, who spoke about the legacy of sporting events for his online lecture series, “Building an anti-racist vocabulary” to Friday.

Sports reporter Howard Bryant spoke about the role of political protests in historical and contemporary sports at a conference sponsored by the Klau Center for Civil and Human Rights in Notre Dame.

The series is directed by Dory Mitros Durham, associate director of the Klau Center and head of the Keough School of Global Affairs’s Racial Justice Initiative, in response to acts of police brutality against George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery and Breonna Taylor in 2020.

The program objective is to provide “to the students, faculty, staff and alumni of the University of Notre-Dame a critical and sustained engagement on interdisciplinary topics related to the understanding of systematic racism and engagement in the daily work of fight against racism”.

Bryant is an author, sports reporter, senior writer and columnist for ESPN. He is also a sports correspondent for The Sports Reporters talk show with ESPN and for Weekend Edition with NPR. He has written five books including “The Heritage: Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism” and “Full Dissidence: Notes from an Uneven Playing Field”.

Bryant began the conference by discussing the history of politics in sports. He noted that it dates back to the 1936 Olympics, where black sprinters like Jesse Owens and Mack Robinson “denounced the idea of ​​white superiority which was obviously what Hitler was pushing.” Bryant referred to this as “the start of what I call ‘The Heritage’,” which Bryant explained as a tradition of athletes using sport as an arena to make a political statement.

Noting that the impact of sport on politics was “obvious, Bryant noted that a problem arose when “black athletes themselves took the agency” to talk about racial injustice.

Bryant went on to explain how Tommie Smith and John Carlos sacrificed their careers at the 1968 Olympics for raising their fists in the air on the Olympic podium in black solidarity.

“The fact that the Olympic Committee voted on Tommie Smith and John Carlos, just for that gesture, for the simple expression, tell you how much that meant, he said.

Bryant asked the audience, “Why did we build a dynamic where you risk everything just to support black people?”

Despite this legacy of protest, some sports fans do not want to see politics during games. Bryant says there is no difference between the protest we see shown by black athletes and the patriotism we see on the pitch. After September 11, Bryant says patriotism was brought “into the stadium full time.” He asked why people don’t treat playing the national anthem “like it’s not political”.

Bryant thinks America pitted patriotism and protest against each other. Colin Kaepernick kneeling during the hymn should not be seen as disrespectful to the flag or unpatriotic, he said. He argues that people should not view protest as unpatriotic, but as a by-product of patriotism.

He expands on this question by exploring the activism that people see in sports today. He asks, “What happens when the protester becomes power?” Howard doesn’t think we should attribute their individual wealth – like Lebron James’ net worth of $ 50 million – to actual activism.

“The athletes are reaching a point where they represent what they were protesting five years ago,” he said. Athletes are now the people in the boardrooms who make decisions about sports teams.

Bryant questioned the future of sports activism, asking “Are athletes using their power for collective action or are they just building their fortunes and empire?” He urged athletes to focus on the big picture rather than themselves.

Anyone interested in learning more about upcoming speakers in the “Building an Anti-Racist Vocabulary” lecture series can register online at Klau Center website.

Tags: Building an anti-racist vocabulary, Colin Kaepernick, ESPN, Kneeling during the national anthem, nfl protests, racial injustice, sports journalism


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Smith Elementary Journalism Class Contributes Campus Newsletter | School news https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/smith-elementary-journalism-class-contributes-campus-newsletter-school-news/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 19:54:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/smith-elementary-journalism-class-contributes-campus-newsletter-school-news/ Smith Elementary School started a journalism course this semester. Fifth grade students learning journalism are, left to right, Jonathen Milton, Justin Campos, Alexsander Gutierrez, Kylee Gibson, Jimena Cortez. Students write stories and draw editorials for the campus newsletter. Have you ever sat down and said to yourself, “Global pollution is the number one cause of […]]]>






Smith Elementary School started a journalism course this semester. Fifth grade students learning journalism are, left to right, Jonathen Milton, Justin Campos, Alexsander Gutierrez, Kylee Gibson, Jimena Cortez. Students write stories and draw editorials for the campus newsletter.


Have you ever sat down and said to yourself, “Global pollution is the number one cause of global warming? ”

Smith Elementary School Kylee Gibson, 10, interviewed a school counselor for the campus newsletter.

Her classmate Jonathan Milton, 10, wrote an op-ed on global warming from a child’s perspective.

Alexsander Gutierrez wrote an editorial cartoon.

Students are enrolled in the school’s journalism course, offered for the first time this fall. The class is supervised by Jillian Haberman.

“I am only the facilitator. I really guide them, ”she explained. “They do all the work themselves.

The course was the brainchild of Gibson, who saw it as a natural extension of a book writing project in his fourth year.

“We were writing ‘A Cracked Fair Tale of Goldilocks and the Three Bears’ last spring and I thought, wow, that’s fun. I wonder what other writing project we could do in school.

She approached the book’s writing coach and came up with the idea of ​​a journalism class where students could hone their writing skills.

The class meets every morning from 7 a.m. to 7:30 a.m. in Haberman’s classroom where they discuss history and editorial ideas and work on their writing and sketching projects.

Jimena Cortez, 11, and Justin Campos, 10, join Gibson, Alexsander and Gutierrez in the class.


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Dean of journalism becomes president of national journalism association https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/dean-of-journalism-becomes-president-of-national-journalism-association/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 16:18:14 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/dean-of-journalism-becomes-president-of-national-journalism-association/ The dean of the Reynolds School of Journalism, Alan Stavitsky, became president of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication (ASJMC) for the term 2021 to 2022. The ASJMC is a national educational association of approximately 190 journalism and mass communication programs at the college and university levels, primarily in the United States […]]]>

The dean of the Reynolds School of Journalism, Alan Stavitsky, became president of the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communication (ASJMC) for the term 2021 to 2022. The ASJMC is a national educational association of approximately 190 journalism and mass communication programs at the college and university levels, primarily in the United States and Canada.

Stavitsky was elected by ASJMC members to the association leadership level in 2019 and is assuming the presidency this year after serving as vice president and president-elect.

“Dean Stavitsky’s presidency reflects how the university’s professors are respected across the country as leaders in their disciplines,” said Brian Sandoval, president of the University of Nevada, Reno. “The academic community has benefited from Al’s leadership over the past decade, and I look forward to seeing his impact on journalism education nationwide.”

In his role as President, Stavitsky will lead ASJMC’s efforts to help administrators of journalism and mass communication programs meet the challenges of the pandemic, promote innovation in an era of technological and industrial change, and support the accreditation process for journalism and mass media. communication units.

“ASJMC provided me with great inspiration and support during my deanery,” said Stavitsky. “It is now a privilege to have the opportunity to serve the organization as President.

Stavitsky became Dean of the Reynolds School in 2012. During his tenure, the school won several awards, including the Online News Association’s Grand Prize for Innovation in Journalism Education and the Prize of the equity and diversity of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

He holds the Distinguished Scholar designation for the Library of Congress Radio Preservation Working Group and oversees the University’s public radio stations, KUNR and KNCJ.


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Nevada’s First “Local Journalism Day” Features Discussion in Reno https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/nevadas-first-local-journalism-day-features-discussion-in-reno/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 14:00:30 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/nevadas-first-local-journalism-day-features-discussion-in-reno/ A discussion of a growing crisis affecting local news will take place in Reno during Nevada’s first journalism vacation. Tuesday, October 19, proclaimed “Local Journalism Day” by the Governor of Nevada. news in the Silver State and across the country. In Nevada, the number of employed journalists has declined dramatically over the past two decades. […]]]>

A discussion of a growing crisis affecting local news will take place in Reno during Nevada’s first journalism vacation.

Tuesday, October 19, proclaimed “Local Journalism Day” by the Governor of Nevada. news in the Silver State and across the country.

In Nevada, the number of employed journalists has declined dramatically over the past two decades. Widespread downsizing and the loss of local newsrooms have reduced access to information that previously helped foster community ties statewide.

UNR invites the public to attend the free event, which will be held at 6 p.m. at the Nevada Museum of Art. The event will be both in person and available virtually. You can book your tickets here.

During the event, Larry Ryckman, editor-in-chief of independent digital news organization The Colorado Sun and former editor and reporter for the Denver Post and the AP, will summarize the crisis in local news through the country and will discuss the means by which certain states are combating it.

Ryckman, a Reynolds School alumnus, will then host a panel of local Nevada journalists, including Arianna Bennett, presenter and reporter at KTVN News; KUNR public radio news director Michelle Billman; This is Reno publisher and editor Bob Conrad; editor-in-chief of the Reno Gazette Journal, Brian Duggan; and Nevada Independent reporter Jazmin Orozco Rodriguez.

After the discussion, audience members will be invited to ask questions and meet with local journalistic organizations at a reception at the show.

Follow Evan Haddad for timely, relevant and compelling reporting on food, drink and city life in Reno. Please consider supporting his work by subscribing to RGJ for information about northern Nevada that you won’t find anywhere else.



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Hong Kong and the future of Chinese-language journalism https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/hong-kong-and-the-future-of-chinese-language-journalism/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 23:00:20 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/hong-kong-and-the-future-of-chinese-language-journalism/ Author: Joyce Nip, University of Sydney The closure of Apple Daily is symbolic of the rapid decline in press freedom in Hong Kong since the enactment of the National Security Act on July 1, 2020. Beijing is pushing for greater cultural integration between Hong Kong and mainland China through a new state-owned enterprise, which will […]]]>

Author: Joyce Nip, University of Sydney

The closure of Apple Daily is symbolic of the rapid decline in press freedom in Hong Kong since the enactment of the National Security Act on July 1, 2020.

Beijing is pushing for greater cultural integration between Hong Kong and mainland China through a new state-owned enterprise, which will oversee mainland China’s media, publishing and cultural operations in the Special Administrative Region. Its first move was to buy Phoenix Television and become its major shareholder.

Since the early 2000s, enjoying greater freedom under the “one country, two systems” arrangement, critical, citizen and professional news media have emerged on digital platforms in Hong Kong. Meanwhile, digital media launched by individuals and state media supporting Beijing has also spread. The National Security Law now poses unprecedented challenges to the remaining spaces of independent journalism in Hong Kong. Ext. 852 ceased its information activities and D100 the radio suspended one of its channels after the arrest of one of its hosts on grounds of national security.

Other independent media continue uncompromisingly, but some fear they won’t be around for a long time.

On the occasion of the second anniversary of the Yuen Long attacks of July 21, News from the standHong Kong’s largest social media provider of information released an explosive video report that provided evidence that the attacks were carried out by thugs for pay. But when two pro-Beijing media in Hong Kong contradicted the video report, News from the stand had to stress again that their investigation was limited to scrutiny Public communications on social media and did not include private social media group from which the conflicting evidence is said to have originated.

This case illustrates the increased demand placed on critical journalists in Hong Kong. Every detail has to be right, otherwise the reporter and the organization could get into trouble. The government is already considering legislating against fake news and disinformation.

Sourcing information is becoming increasingly difficult, especially for information providers who focus on systemic issues rather than accidental events. As civil servants pledge loyalty to the government and unions and political groups are dissolved, the news agenda easily becomes dominated by government and big business.

It is this operational environment that budding journalists in Hong Kong face. The Hong Kong Journalists Association has traditionally supported the professional development of journalists, but its legitimacy is contested by the Chinese party media and the Hong Kong security chief. These difficulties do not yet deter young people from enrolling in journalism programs. But will there be room for critical journalism when they’re ready to publish?

After his collective resignation at the end of 2020, the China reporting team of I-Cable news found a new home in New citizens. But they no longer have correspondents stationed in Beijing or Guangzhou.

In the face of uncertainty, News from the stand removed columns and opinion pieces published before May 2021 from its website for the safety of contributors and stopped accepting donations.

Initium, winner of several awards for in-depth reporting on mainland China, Taiwan and Hong Kong, announced in early August that it would move its headquarters from Hong Kong to Singapore. Although Singapore is not known for press freedom, the move puts the media out of the immediate control of the target of its critical reporting. He said, “Mainland China and Hong Kong will remain our priority.”

Chinese-language news providers in Hong Kong primarily target the local audience, but the plight they face has ramifications for the wider news ecosystem. Market-oriented journalism in mainland China was once bold, and the news outlets in Hong Kong lent their support by posting sensitive stories that their counterparts across the border shared with them. Those days are over.

Other independent news providers in Hong Kong continue to provide critical coverage for China. The New citizens The Chinese team, for example, reported on the sentencing of Chinese citizens who leaked details of Xi Jinping’s family on the internet, although mainstream media backed away from the story. But editor-in-chief Szeto Yuen said in May that he believes the remaining freedom may come to an end soon.

When that happens, international media coverage in China and Hong Kong will suffer, as reports published in Hong Kong will provide material for media organizations elsewhere. The expulsion of Chinese correspondents from Western media only strengthens the role of Hong Kong media.

Globally, Chinese language news is dominated by the Chinese state and state partner media. While they target the Chinese diaspora, the majority being emigrants from mainland China, the recent migration out of Hong Kong may open up opportunities for the development of Hong Kong-oriented Chinese-language journalism in other places. country.

With its freedom of the press, Taiwan has the potential to become the future base of independent journalism in the greater Chinese region. More and more Chinese correspondents for Western media have settled in Taiwan. But so far, the Taiwanese media has focused on relations between Taiwan and mainland China rather than the dynamics within China or Hong Kong. That will have to change before they can play a bigger role in reporting on China. The risk of forced unification by Beijing, of course, is its ever-present vulnerability.

Joyce YM Nip is Associate Professor in the Department of Media and Communications and the Department of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney.


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Climate journalism matures https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/climate-journalism-matures/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 10:07:48 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/climate-journalism-matures/ Residents of Nonthaburi, Thailand face flash floods every year, but this year water levels have risen rapidly and caused more damage than usual. (Pobthum Yingpaiboonsuk / Getty Images) This column is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration co-founded by Colombian Journalism Review and The nation to strengthen coverage of climate history. Mark […]]]>

Cover the climate nowThis column is part of Covering Climate Now, a global journalism collaboration co-founded by Colombian Journalism Review and The nation to strengthen coverage of climate history. Mark Hertsgaard is the Executive Director of CCNow and the Environment Correspondent of The nation. Kyle Pope is editor and publisher of CJR.

IIt has taken too long, but the mainstream media – finally and hesitantly – seems to realize that the climate crisis is a story that can no longer be ignored. Until a few years ago, many of the most influential news organizations in the world, especially in the United States, relegated climate history to the fringes. What we called “climate silence” prevailed.

What a long way. Today, it is not uncommon to see a climate article every day or two on the front page of The Washington Post Where The New York Times, where Sarah Kaplan, Somini Sengupta and Hiroko Tabuchi, among others, produce exceptional reporting. TV channels, long behind in climate reporting, also join them, especially in their morning news broadcasts, where weather experts Al Roker at NBC, Jeff Berardelli at CBS and Ginger Zee at ABC speak often what they do not hesitate to call. “The climate crisis” or even “the climate emergency”. CNN, NPR, the Los Angeles Times, and other mainstream media are hiring journalists, editors, producers and more to staff new or expanding climate units.

It’s not just US newsrooms that are increasing their climate coverage. “Media attention on climate change or global warming in August 2021 was the highest level of coverage [in] almost 12 years, ”reported the University of Colorado Media and Climate Change Observatory, which has long monitored climate coverage of dozens of major print, digital, radio and television media outlets around the world.

Is this coverage sufficient? Not yet, not even close. And there are still plenty of missteps, like when six of America’s biggest commercial broadcasters reported 774 Hurricane Ida in the storm’s first 72 hours and only 4% of them mentioned the words. ” climate change “. But the journey to greater and better climate coverage has clearly begun, and the days, decades indeed, of simply ignoring history seem to be over.

How could they not be? This year’s unprecedented heat, drought, wildfires and storms are changing public attitudes. Three in four Americans now believe global warming is happening today, and 70 percent say they are “very” or “somewhat worried” about it, according to a Yale Program on Climate Communication survey.


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Metro Detroit reporter Danny Fenster faces new charges of illegal associations in Myanmar https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/metro-detroit-reporter-danny-fenster-faces-new-charges-of-illegal-associations-in-myanmar/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 18:50:39 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/metro-detroit-reporter-danny-fenster-faces-new-charges-of-illegal-associations-in-myanmar/ The wheels of justice are moving slowly for a reporter from Metro Detroit who has been in a Burmese prison for more than four months. Metro Detroit reporter Danny Fenster, who has been locked in a Myanmar prison since late May when he tried to return to we, now faces additional charges of violating that […]]]>

The wheels of justice are moving slowly for a reporter from Metro Detroit who has been in a Burmese prison for more than four months.

Metro Detroit reporter Danny Fenster, who has been locked in a Myanmar prison since late May when he tried to return to we, now faces additional charges of violating that country’s Illegal Associations Act.

We just want a timeline. We don’t have that. So all we can do is hope that he is in person in court and that they can move this matter forward. —Bryan Fenster, brother of Danny Fenster

Fenster, 37, is accused of associating with people working against the Myanmar government. The military took control of the previously Democratic country earlier this year. He has had several hearings, but little progress in resolving his case.

Fenster’s brother Bryan says the new charges don’t affect Danny’s situation much.

“There is no change in this charge per se. This somewhat broadens the range of options for the Burmese authorities, ”he said.

A judge announced the new charge Monday during Fenster’s hearing at Insein Prison Court in Yangon, where he is being held. Fenster’s attorney said he had not received further details.

The accusation of illegal associations has been widely used against rebel ethnic groups seeking greater autonomy. Supporters and even journalists contacting such groups have also been prosecuted.

Fenster has previously been charged with incitement, also known as sedition, for allegedly spreading false or inflammatory information. This offense is punishable by up to three years in prison.

Bryan fenster

He is one of some 100 journalists jailed since the Burmese army took control of the country earlier this year. He was the editor of Frontier Myanmar online and was trying to get back to we when he was arrested in May.

A quick resolution would be ideal, says Bryan Fenster.

You really have the impression of wearing concrete shoes. And it is so hard to say because each case is unique in Myanmar. And that’s all we want. We just want a timeline. We don’t have that. So all we can do is have hope that he is in person in court and that they can move this case forward, ”he said.

Since his incarceration, Bryan Fenster says his brother has had a roller coaster of emotions. “He has the right to feel bad. He’s going to have good days and bad days. We all are and we are just thankful that he is in great shape right now.

The US State Department and the Committee to Protect Journalists are working to secure Fenster’s release.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Our newsroom has formed a community advisory group. Here is what we learned https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/our-newsroom-has-formed-a-community-advisory-group-here-is-what-we-learned/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:05:22 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/our-newsroom-has-formed-a-community-advisory-group-here-is-what-we-learned/ A few months ago, we introduced you to The Oaklandside’s First Cohort of Community Advisors, seven longtime Oaklanders we recruited to share their thoughts on our journalism and how we live up to the values ​​we set out in collaboration with our community. We worked with this great group for two months starting in April. […]]]>


A few months ago, we introduced you to The Oaklandside’s First Cohort of Community Advisors, seven longtime Oaklanders we recruited to share their thoughts on our journalism and how we live up to the values ​​we set out in collaboration with our community.

We worked with this great group for two months starting in April. Each week, advisors read three stories posted by our staff and shared their thoughts on each one through a digital survey we created. They also told us which of our “mission metrics” – a set of criteria we use to measure how well our journalism connects to our newsroom’s core values ​​- they thought every story matched, if at all. It gave us a sense of how the people of Oakland view our journalism and whether or not they think it lives up to our mission.

We also received many qualitative contributions from our advisors on how our journalism could better serve Oakland. We created two additional polls that solicited their ideas for the news we cover and held two virtual meetings between advisors and our staff.

Once our Community Advisors completed their work in mid-June, we took the time to synthesize all of their comments to come up with a set of recommendations for the future of our journalism. Here are some of the main takeaways:

  • Include more resource listings, related links, and calls to action. Advisors wanted to know what they could do about particular issues, how they could help, and where they could learn more about the topics we cover. “I always appreciate it when there are links that take you to another article with more information on a particular thing,” said one advisor. “It’s also useful when there are clear ways for people to act and get involved. “
  • Make our writing more accessible. Advisors pointed out that some of our stories used words and terms that many people in Oakland may not be familiar with. We can pay more attention to the language we use, especially in policy-oriented stories, to make sure our writing is easily understood. In response to a story we reported about illegal sublets, a counselor wrote: “It was difficult for me to really understand the story because of the words used which were very particular to a specific area, ie. occurrence housing. It was like I needed to be an expert to find out what was going on.
  • Be clear on what to do next. After reading our stories, counselors regularly asked what happened next and when they could expect a follow-up story. Being more explicit about our intentions to follow the topic will help people know what to expect from our coverage.
  • Incorporate more local history. Of all the mission metrics advisers tagged on the stories they read, “Preserving Oakland’s History and Legacy” was cited the least. At the same time, advisers praised stories, like our article on the Oakland Black Liberation Walking Tour, which focused on the history of Oakland. This challenged us to think of ways to incorporate the story into our reports more regularly.
  • Highlight basic solutions to local problems. Advisors deeply appreciated our profiles of businesses, organizations and community members who find new ways to help our communities thrive and meet challenges. Commenting on our story of how a community organization, Street Level Health, supported the Oaklanders during the pandemic, one advisor said: And the support during this global crisis is not only uplifting but inspiring as well. “
  • Explain our editorial decisions. Comments from advisers have sometimes highlighted how the choices we make about who to quote, what information to include or not to include, or why we chose to make a story in the first place are not always easily understood by readers. The practices and decisions that may be necessary for good journalism, they reminded us, are not always common knowledge to people who are not journalists.
  • Examine how policies and programs affect communities differently. Equity is already at the heart of The Oaklandside’s work, and advisers have often asked larger questions about the implications of local agendas and policy decisions and how specific communities are impacted.
  • Do more visual storytelling. Advisors often said how much they liked the photos of our stories and suggested that we produce videos as well to get more people to see our work.
  • Raise the prospects of young people. We regularly heard counselors asking for more youth voices in our stories, and they praised us when we focused youth in our reporting, such as in our article highlighting how students wanted to see the school year reinvented. “I loved that the students tell us what they want to see rather than just the adults and board members about what they plan to do,” said one advisor.
  • Convene community conversations. Councilors suggested The Oaklandside could host and moderate events to bring together people from different communities, who do not normally dialogue, to discuss the big issues facing the city.

Obviously, our advisors have given us a wealth of ideas on how our journalism could be more in tune with the needs of the people of Oakland. The next step is to act on these recommendations in a concrete way.

To start, we shared the full list of recommendations with staff and together we voted on three to prioritize immediately: producing more stories that elevate local approaches to local issues, incorporate more history and context, and experiment more with visual storytelling.

Over the next few weeks, our team will take action to address these recommendations, such as our new series explore the history of residential buildings in Oakland and the people who lived there.

Since this was a pilot program, we also asked the counselors how they would improve the process for future cohorts. While most appreciated the experience and the excuse to sit down and read local journalism each week, they suggested a variety of ideas, including more time for counselors to speak with staff, more time ‘opportunities to share specific article ideas and to meet in person next time, something we haven’t done this round because of the pandemic.

We are proud to share what we have learned from this generous group, and hope this information may be useful to other local newsrooms as well.

We’re also curious to hear what you think of this work and how our newsroom can better serve the needs of Oakland residents. Use the form below to share your contribution.



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“At least 10 attacks on women journalists in Turkey in September” https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/at-least-10-attacks-on-women-journalists-in-turkey-in-september/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 04:52:40 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/at-least-10-attacks-on-women-journalists-in-turkey-in-september/ Click to read the article in Turkish The Coalition for Women in Journalism (CFWIJ) released its report “Press Freedom for Women Journalists” for September 2021. In one month, the CFWIJ documented 61 cases of violations against women journalists. Types of violations include detentions, legal harassment and physical assaults on the ground, among other types of […]]]>

Click to read the article in Turkish

The Coalition for Women in Journalism (CFWIJ) released its report “Press Freedom for Women Journalists” for September 2021.

In one month, the CFWIJ documented 61 cases of violations against women journalists. Types of violations include detentions, legal harassment and physical assaults on the ground, among other types of press freedom attacks against women journalists working around the world.

While at least 20 female journalists were targeted by troll campaigns in Canada and Pakistan in September 2021, 12 female journalists were physically assaulted on the ground in Turkey, Lebanon and the United States. At least 10 female journalists were also physically assaulted in Turkey, Slovenia, Tunisia, Montenegro, Afghanistan, the United States and Nigeria.

Canada was the first country with the most cases. At least 19 female reporters have been targeted by organized troll campaigns. Turkey followed Canada with at least 10 attacks on women journalists on the ground. Five female reporters have been harassed online in Pakistan.

The report shared the following details about Turkey:

“At least three female journalists were embarrassed by police forces as they followed the September 1 World Peace Day protest in Istanbul.

“Seven women journalists were prevented from following the Kobani trial which took place in Ankara. Learn more about the case.

At least two female journalists were physically assaulted by police as they followed the September 1 World Peace Day protest in Istanbul.

Jinnews journalist Öznur Değer has been investigated for his messages and stories about the murder of seven related relatives in Konya. Read on for details.

“The court sentenced Nurcan Kaya to fifteen months in prison on terrorism-related charges and deferred the announcement of the verdict. (EMK / SD)


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Veteran journalist Recto Mercene dies https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/veteran-journalist-recto-mercene-dies/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 12:37:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/veteran-journalist-recto-mercene-dies/ Recto Mercene (Photo from Facebook) MANILA, Philippines – Veteran journalist Recto Mercene has died at age 77, BusinessMirror, his news agency reported on Sunday. Mercene took the iconic photo of the bloodied body of former Senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. on the tarmac. Ninoy shooting According to BusinessMirror, Mercene was preparing to come out of […]]]>

Recto Mercene (Photo from Facebook)

MANILA, Philippines – Veteran journalist Recto Mercene has died at age 77, BusinessMirror, his news agency reported on Sunday.

Mercene took the iconic photo of the bloodied body of former Senator Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino Jr. on the tarmac.

Ninoy shooting

According to BusinessMirror, Mercene was preparing to come out of confinement as he had been in hospital since September 7 after falling and hitting his head.

Initially he was confined due to subarachnoid hemorrhage and later due to relapsing fever and some disturbing indicators.

Two weeks later, tests showed that her cancer had spread to her bone marrow at an advanced stage. He was then to receive palliative care at home.

Mercene died in her sleep at 3 p.m. on Saturday, her youngest child, Danica, said.

Prior to her journalism career, Mercene was an air traffic controller and private pilot for 18 years, BusinessMirror explained.

Mercene covered aviation, defense, Malacañang, the Senate and foreign affairs.

BusinessMirror said Mercene had spent nearly 60 years “soaring and wandering, in various embodiments of a traveler.”

“The man who has spent nearly six decades soaring and roaming, in various embodiments of the traveler – first as a private pilot and air traffic controller, then as an aviation journalist and photojournalist, then as a diplomatic journalist and foreign affairs – has gone to limitless skies, where air traffic needs no control and where planes never have to take off or land. Fly high, idol, legend, role model for young journalists, friend of thousands and advocate for ordinary people – you are the irreplaceable treasure of Filipino journalism, ”BusinessMirror said.

Meanwhile, the Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) offered its condolences to Mercene’s bereaved family and friends.

“The Office of Public and Cultural Diplomacy (OPCD) of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs extends its deepest condolences to the family and friends of Mr. Recto Mercene, one of the most esteemed and respected members of the DFA Press Corps, who died yesterday afternoon, ”the agency said in a statement.

“As a photojournalist, Recto told the story of our country by capturing, with courage, skill and artistry, some of its pivotal moments. DFA-OPCD is proud to have worked with a seasoned photojournalist who has remained humble, sincere and professional – a just and good friend of those who have become spokespersons for the Department and the Department as a whole, ”he said. -he adds.

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