Media Industry – Agri Turismo Denderacchi http://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 23:54:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-agriturismo-32x32.png Media Industry – Agri Turismo Denderacchi http://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/ 32 32 Canadian admits to fabricating detailed terrorism story in New York Times podcast https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/canadian-admits-to-fabricating-detailed-terrorism-story-in-new-york-times-podcast/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 17:25:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/canadian-admits-to-fabricating-detailed-terrorism-story-in-new-york-times-podcast/ OTTAWA – A Canadian admitted in court on Friday that he made up stories about his service as an Islamic State fighter and executioner in Syria. In return, Canadian authorities dropped criminal charges against him for carrying out a hoax involving the threat of terrorism. The man, Shehroze Chaudhry, had posted fabricated stories of his […]]]>

OTTAWA – A Canadian admitted in court on Friday that he made up stories about his service as an Islamic State fighter and executioner in Syria. In return, Canadian authorities dropped criminal charges against him for carrying out a hoax involving the threat of terrorism.

The man, Shehroze Chaudhry, had posted fabricated stories of his life as a terrorist in Syria on social media from 2016, according to a joint statement of the facts between prosecutors and the defense. He then repeated them to several news outlets, including the New York Times, which then amplified his accounts, according to the statement.

Mr. Chaudhry, who is now 26, had come to regret giving interviews to the media and “wanted to finish his studies and change his life,” the statement said.

Prosecutors agreed to drop the charges because Mr. Chaudhry’s accounts “were errors resulting from immaturity – not of sinister intent and certainly not of criminal intent,” wrote his lawyer, Nader R Hasan, in an email.

Mr. Chaudhry was, however, required to file a so-called peace bond of $ 10,000, which would be forfeited if he violated the terms of the agreement. The prosecutor was not immediately available for comment.

As Abu Huzayfah, Mr. Chaudhry, who lives in the Toronto suburb of Burlington, Ont., Was the central figure in The Times 10-part podcast series “Caliphate”. The release of this series in 2018, and other reporting based on Mr. Chaudhry’s accounts, created a political storm in the Parliament of Canada among opposition parties who have repeatedly attacked the government of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for appearing to allow a terrorist killer to roam the streets of the suburbs freely. Toronto.

But in truth, there was little or no risk to the public. The statement of facts presented to the Ontario Court of Justice in Brampton on Friday concluded: “Mr. Chaudhry has never entered Syria or participated in ISIS operations anywhere in the world.

Last year, Mr. Chaudhry was arrested in Canada for carrying out a hoax that terrified and threatened the public. After his arrest, The Times re-examined the “Caliphate” series and found “a history of Mr. Chaudhry’s misrepresentation and no corroboration that he committed the atrocities he described on the” Caliphate “podcast.” The podcast didn’t hold up, the Times said.

The review of the series found that “The Times reporters were too gullible about the verification measures that were undertaken and disregarded the lack of corroboration of essential aspects of Mr. Chaudhry’s story,” said Danielle Rhoades Ha, spokesperson. word of the Times. “Since that time, we have introduced new practices to avoid similar failures,” she said.

In 2019, “Caliphate” won an Overseas Press Club award and a Peabody Award. The Overseas Press Club canceled his price, and The Times returned the Peabody. The Pulitzer Prize board also revoked its recognition of the podcast as a finalist.

The Royal Canadian Mounted Police interviewed Mr. Chaudhry in April 2017 – a year before the “Caliphate” podcast – based on information from his social media posts. At that point, he told them that he had made up his stories of being an ISIS fighter in Syria.

Despite this confession to the police, he continued to portray himself in media and social media interviews as a veteran of the Islamic State almost until his arrest in September of last year.

The statement of facts presented to the court on Friday indicates that a Times reporter, Rukmini Callimachi, prompted Mr. Chaudhry to turn his false story.

“Sometimes during the podcast, Ms. Callimachi specifically encouraged Mr. Chaudhry to discuss acts of violence,” the statement read. When Mr. Chaudhry expressed his reluctance to do so, she replied, ‘You have to talk about the murders. “”

Ms. Callimachi denies making the comment and the quote does not appear in the podcast transcript.

Mr. Chaudhry’s trial on the terrorist hoax charges was scheduled to begin in February. Prosecutors agreed to drop them in exchange for his confession, as well as his consent to publish the peace bond and abide by its terms.

Under the peace bond, which is reserved for people whose authorities fear they will commit terrorist acts, Mr. Chaudhry is to remain in Ontario for the next year and live with his parents. He is prohibited from owning weapons, must continue to receive advice and is required to report any change of virtual or physical address to the police.

The statement of facts indicates that while Mr. Chaudhry’s accounts of his participation in ISIS executions may be false, “they provide reasonable grounds to fear that Mr. Chaudhry may commit a terrorism offense.”

Mr. Hasan, Mr. Chaudhry’s lawyer, said his client “admitted to making mistakes”.

Instagram posts from 2016 – made under Mr Chaudhry’s name and posted with an identifiable photograph of his face – said Mr Chaudhry visited Syria in 2014 and was incorporated into the Amniyat section of Islamic State, a group responsible for internal security. , “For a little less than a year”.

“I have been on the battlefield,” the messages said. “I support the brothers who are fighting on the pitch.”

During this time, however, Mr. Chaudhry was either with his family in Burlington or worked at a restaurant he owns in nearby Oakville, Ontario.

In November 2016, the Middle East Media Research Institute, a Washington-based group, compiled Mr. Chaudhry’s online allegations of terrorist activity in a report that was distributed to Ms. Callimachi and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, between others.

This report prompted a counterterrorism unit made up of members of various Canadian law enforcement and intelligence agencies, including the mounted police, to initiate the terrorism investigation.

After confirming Mr. Chaudhry’s identity by comparing a portrait online to his driver’s license photo, police also obtained his travel records. During a meeting with the police on April 12, 2017, Mr. Chaudhry confirmed that he had written these messages.

“He also readily admitted that he had never been to Syria,” according to the agreed statement of facts presented to the court.

The statement also said that shortly after receiving the research group’s report, Ms. Callimachi emailed Mr. Chaudhry asking if he would speak about his alleged experiences within the Islamic State. She quickly traveled to Toronto to record interviews that were used for “Caliphate”.

Errol P. Mendes, a law professor at the University of Ottawa, said the decision to drop the charges suggested prosecutors and the judge had concluded that Mr. Chaudhry was not a danger but rather “a youngster. immature man who basically made up a lot of things and tried to convince people that he was much more influential than him.

Mr. Hasan, the defense attorney, said in the email that the resolution of the case “takes into account the tremendous progress Mr. Chaudhry has made over the past two years.”

“Despite the global media attention this case received and the stress of a criminal charge,” he wrote, “Mr. Chaudhry was able to graduate from college and keep full-time employment.


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Lawmakers see the way to harness tech, but it’s not easy https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/lawmakers-see-the-way-to-harness-tech-but-its-not-easy/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 13:06:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/lawmakers-see-the-way-to-harness-tech-but-its-not-easy/ WASHINGTON – “Facebook and Big Tech are facing a Big Tobacco moment,” said Connecticut Democrat Sen. Richard Blumenthal this week when a whistleblower testified about how the company’s social media products were harming teens . “I think that’s an appropriate analogy,” Wyoming Republican Senator Cynthia Lummis later added. The whistleblower’s testimony and the thousands of […]]]>

WASHINGTON – “Facebook and Big Tech are facing a Big Tobacco moment,” said Connecticut Democrat Sen. Richard Blumenthal this week when a whistleblower testified about how the company’s social media products were harming teens .

“I think that’s an appropriate analogy,” Wyoming Republican Senator Cynthia Lummis later added.

The whistleblower’s testimony and the thousands of internal documents she shared with lawmakers generated unusual bipartisan bonhomie in a divided Washington. Senators said it was time for Congress to rally around new regulations to curb the business and perhaps the tech industry as a whole.

But if what Big Tech faces is like what happened to Big Tobacco – a calculation of the damage the industry has done to society, and children in particular – what lies ahead is likely to be a complicated road of several years. towards new rules and regulations, without guarantee of result.

Washington is weighing many proposals to restrict the industry and hold it more accountable. Some lawmakers have urged reworking a law that protects tech companies from lawsuits, amending it so that companies can be held accountable if their software amplifies harmful speech. Another idea would force social media companies to share a lot more information about their software, which is often a black box, and data about how people interact with their services.

Lawmakers have proposed creating a new federal agency dedicated to overseeing tech companies, or expanding the power of the Federal Trade Commission. They have imposed stricter laws for the privacy and safety of children and to regulate the behavioral advertising business models of Facebook and Google. And a handful of bills to revise antitrust laws, in an effort to make the public less dependent on a small number of tech companies, have come out of a House committee.

But passing any of these options is a steep climb. Tech companies swim in wealth and use it to influence lawmakers, creating the largest army of lobbyists of any industry in Washington. Dozens of privacy and speech protection bills have stalled in Congress in recent years.

The issues are also complex. Sharing much more data with researchers, some argue, could invade people’s privacy. Attempts to even tightly regulate content on platforms like Facebook run into free speech problems.

Perhaps the best chance for a crackdown on the industry is for President Biden and his administration to act with force. He has yet to put his weight behind the bills, but has placed some of the industry’s top critics in top regulatory positions. Lina Khan, president of the FTC, and Jonathan Kanter, the candidate for head of the Department of Justice’s antitrust division, have vowed to hamper corporate power.

“Facebook has taken a hard hit this week, but they are capable of taking many hits just like the tobacco industry,” said Allan Brandt, a Harvard professor and expert on the rise and fall of the industry. tobacco.

It took more than 50 years from the first published research into the dangers of cigarettes, and more than a decade after a whistleblower shared internal documents proving tobacco companies were hiding their knowledge of the ailments of their people. products, before there is a meaningful government. regulation, he said.

“There will be regulation for Facebook and other tech companies,” Mr. Brandt said, “but I’m skeptical of a path to successful regulation anytime soon.”

The European Union has for years been more aggressive against technology companies than the United States, on issues such as antitrust and data privacy. Testimony last week from Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen stepped up calls to pass proposals that would impose stricter rules on how Facebook and other internet companies monitor their platforms, and add competition rules. more stringent in order to reduce their digital dominance. economy. The laws could be passed as early as next year.

But in Washington, a major obstacle to legislation is that Democrats and Republicans view issues of technological power and social media rhetoric differently. Democrats want to tackle the spread of disinformation and the amplification of nefarious political rhetoric, while Republicans argue that Facebook, Google, Twitter and other social media platforms censor conservative views.

And when it comes to whether to dissolve companies, many Democrats see antitrust measures as a way to slow down the most powerful tech platforms and fight privacy, security and disinformation. Datas. Some Republicans say there is a lot of competition in the industry, and breaking up companies would be an example of government overtaking.

“Just because we hold the hammer of antitrust law in our hands doesn’t mean we have to treat every concern like a nail, lest we risk bludgeoning our entire economy,” Republican member Christine Wilson recently told Congress. of the FTC.

Facebook, Google and Twitter have said they welcome increased government surveillance, signaling their support for stricter data privacy rules and a dedicated agency regulating the tech sector. But they also warn that many state and federal proposals to strengthen antitrust laws, restrict data collection and hold companies accountable for damaging speech could backfire.

Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg said the whistleblower’s claims that the company prioritized profits over security were “deeply illogical.” The company also rejected comparisons with the tobacco industry.

“It’s an absurd comparison,” said Andy Stone, spokesperson for Facebook. “Social media helps people connect and small businesses thrive. Instead of making false equivalents, the focus should be on updated regulations to address privacy, data portability, content standards and elections. “

But many lawmakers said the comparison of industries was not hyperbole and was in fact informative.

State investigators uncovered tobacco company RJ Reynolds’ secret marketing plans to use cartoon mascot Joe Camel to turn kids into smokers, a finding that has helped substantiate lawsuits against the company and urge legislators to act.

Some of the internal documents Ms Haugen shared with lawmakers showed that many teens felt bad about their body image after spending time on Instagram, Facebook’s photo-sharing app, sometimes to the point of express plans to harm oneself. Other documents showed the company was investigating how it could market even younger children.

Mr Blumenthal, who successfully led a lawsuit against Big Tobacco in the 1990s as a Connecticut attorney general, said the importance of the documents immediately struck him.

“It was a light bulb, and all memories came back from the strategy papers drafted by the tobacco companies to reach college kids,” he said. “It was as if you could just rearrange the words and replace them with ‘tobacco’.”

He also noted that the technology is not exactly like the tobacco industry. The technology has broad legal protections that prevent state attorneys general from suing companies the way it has.

Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, a law passed in 1996, protects businesses from most lawsuits for comments, photos and other content that users post on their sites. As a result, if someone is hurt by what a user posts, the public – and the government – have little recourse against the companies.

Mr. Blumenthal supports the revision of this law to reduce these protections. He pushed for a bill that would remove the shield if services allowed the broadcast of child abuse images. Other lawmakers have proposed removing legal protection when corporate algorithms amplify – by promoting, recommending, and automatically ranking high – content that violates certain anti-terrorism and civil rights laws.

Ms Haugen said such changes, resulting in the possibility of lawsuits, would force Facebook and other social media companies to stop using software that prioritizes engaging and promoting the most harmful content.

But Mr Blumenthal appeared to recognize that any change would not happen quickly.

“This battle will not take place in the courtroom,” he said.

“Congress must act,” Lummis said. “I keep all options on the table, but even in this polarizing environment, I am encouraged by the bipartisan concern we have here.”


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Sportel’s Joanna Merchie explains what to expect from the 2022 Miami sports media convention’s ‘Rendezvous’ https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/sportels-joanna-merchie-explains-what-to-expect-from-the-2022-miami-sports-media-conventions-rendezvous/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 11:44:24 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/sportels-joanna-merchie-explains-what-to-expect-from-the-2022-miami-sports-media-conventions-rendezvous/ Leading companies, organizations and decision-makers from the sports media and tech industry traveled to Monaco this week for the return of Sportel‘s flagship event after a two-year absence due to the pandemic. The sports media convention had a number of health and safety protocols in place to ensure that participants could safely enjoy the opportunity […]]]>

Leading companies, organizations and decision-makers from the sports media and tech industry traveled to Monaco this week for the return of Sportels flagship event after a two-year absence due to the pandemic.

The sports media convention had a number of health and safety protocols in place to ensure that participants could safely enjoy the opportunity to reconnect through networking, masterclass sessions and business meetings. , with people such as LaLiga, Matchroom, Eurosport and the International Tennis Federation (ITF).

Next year, Sportel will return to sunny Miami, Florida for a self-proclaimedMeet at the Marriott Biscayne Bay hotel from March 14 to 15. Armed with a new event format and new products such as affordable meeting modules and personalized exhibits, the two-day gathering will provide an ideal opportunity to bring together international sports decision-makers in the Americas.

With this years edition of Sportel Monaco in full flow, SportsPro sat down with conference executive director Joanna Merchie to discuss what the industry can expect in Miami next year.

As this is your first in-person event in quite some time, how does it feel to have everyone back at Sportel Monaco this year?

It is absolutely fantastic. We’re really excited – as I think the industry is – to finally be able to get back together. We saw a snowball, especially last month, the buzz has been around, everyone is coming to Sportel. People are really, really keen to get back to business and we’re having a 100% in-person event so that’s great.

For the future, what can you tell us about next years event in Miami?

We have a new event with a new format, a new name. Thisit’s a completely redesigned format adapted for our overseas event. WeI went to a spring market for many, many years, but Sportel’s managing director, Laurent Puons decided it was time to do something new. Obviously since the Covid, people have had marketing budgets [readjusted] and time too is such an essence. Not just Covid, I think in general now we tend to do things faster, and we can do things with technology a lot faster.

He therefore decided to launch Sportel Rendez-vous, and it will take place in Miami. We just announced it about a week ago, because we decided that to relaunch after this time, Miami is the best place in the United States to bring together international decision-makers within the Americas, because it’s a place really central which our Sportel community has always loved to attend. We had been ready to participate in this event for a few months, but we really waited until it was announced that the American borders were going to open.

We really believe that the industry will be delighted to return, as a first step, to the Americas. We have also brought some great new products for this new event. Thiss better value for money, better return on investment and streamlined over just two days instead of the three for the market, or even four last year with our conference day.

So we have a simplified event, it will be an international market and a large-scale conference summit. We have a new exceptional admission price, only 490 €, which represents a significant reduction on our general events abroad.

For our exhibitors we have new products like meeting modules, which are kind of a modern version of a table with a branding and passes, which a lot of people just want to do. Then we have meeting rooms which can be fully equipped, which can replace a meeting booth, and then we will also have custom booths for people who want to do something a little more special. And of course, too, at Sportel, there are always many opportunities to speak out about the brand and to sponsor them.

You presented some of the new products that will be on display at Sportel Rendez-vous. How will this event be different from what Sportel has been offering for 30 years?

Sportel Monaco is emblematic and we are resuming our activities now. We all hope and pray that the industry, business, travel and everything will continue.

However, it is really our event abroad that we just wanted to give a fresh new look. So I think with our new products, our streamlined timing, it will be easier access for people who really need to travel, because we have a lot of people from the UK and Europe coming. So you have to go to the United States, from Asia, there is also this trip, it’s a longer trip, so we take all that into consideration.

So I think this is a new, modern and innovative concept that will suit our community very well. And we already have a lot of interest.

By hosting an event in the United States, what kind of access will attendees have to this market?

In Monaco we have an international event, but people definitely want to go [to the US] – certainly our European customers – to meet more of an American flair. In general, we also have some of the big American companies at Sportel Monaco, but it may be more of an international division. So if they go to the United States, they really want to meet to do business in the Americas, meet the NBA or the NFL on business there, and not the other way around.

What else can we expect to see at Sportel events in the future?

Although we have the market, which is the heart of Sportel, wereally developed the conference program. This is something that we are developing with our clients who are already at the event, and we have some guest speakers. It’s something that’s really taking off now, right nowa great program here [in Monaco] also.

What we will also do are focus more. For example, in the United States next year, what’s really hot is sports betting and more specifically live sports betting. So many of our clients are in partnership, theyre embarking on this with the legalization of gambling and betting in the United States. It is a hot topic. Also how women leaders are changing the perception of sports media. We’ll be looking at all the sports tech that’s coming in, AI and AR, because everything exploded during Covid, and remote production, all the different techniques.

So this is something that we are really going to develop as well, because it all goes together. All OTT platforms, all second, third generation platforms, what they offer. There are also esports. There are a lot of cross communities that we are developing here.

In the future, are you considering other potential locations in the United States or around the world?

For next year, Miami is an iconic place for us, and really where a large part of our community in the United States [is]. It has always worked very well for us. If they wanted to go, for example, to the West Coast, it could be interesting to develop, especially with all the sports technology of San Francisco. This is something that we will continue to examine.

We are also interested in continuing to look at Asia and beyond. WeWe’re going to take it step by step, seeing how things are going in the Covid situation, the ability for people to travel and where our community wants to go, and trying to bring them new markets as well.

We will certainly continue to search, continue to innovate. At the moment, we are following the flamingos.



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Yash Vashishtha set to revolutionize advertising and marketing industry with social media https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/yash-vashishtha-set-to-revolutionize-advertising-and-marketing-industry-with-social-media/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 11:44:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/yash-vashishtha-set-to-revolutionize-advertising-and-marketing-industry-with-social-media/ ABP digital brand studio | Posted 07.10.21, 17:14 PM They say it takes a lot of determination and courage to make sure you are living the life of your dreams and Yash Vashishtha is a living example of that. Hailing from Mumbai, the enthusiast has driven the market with his immense knowledge and passion. Currently, […]]]>


ABP digital brand studio

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Posted 07.10.21, 17:14 PM


They say it takes a lot of determination and courage to make sure you are living the life of your dreams and Yash Vashishtha is a living example of that. Hailing from Mumbai, the enthusiast has driven the market with his immense knowledge and passion. Currently, he is the owner of leading social media marketing agency named Social Matte Media which is known for its innovative ideas to increase brand reach.

Over time, Yash has built up a great team of experts who work diligently to help their clients with their businesses. The covid era has been a curse on all businesses, including the advertising industry. Yash believes entrepreneurship is about solving people’s problems. Therefore, to solve this problem, Yash created the startup Social Matte Media. He solved the sudden hiatus in the advertising industry.

By converting online news portals into marketing portals, Yash and his team have taken the lead in being the change in the marketing and advertising industry. By creating media portals on multiple social media platforms including YouTube, Instagram and Facebook, they ensure a wider reach of the project from the client to the audience via one click.

When asked how his solutions will benefit people in their business, Yash said, “Currently, we have a network of over 1,000 media portals with an audience network of over 800 million people. Our team has revolutionized online advertising medium. and has collaborated with brands through these media pages. ”On top of that, the owner also claims to have monetized existing media portals and has taken the initiative to provide business to all existing and new customers.

Regarding revenue generation, Yash revealed that Social Matte Media connects brands to media portals willing to advertise their products through social media marketing at minimal cost. With each transaction, they reduce a certain percentage which they keep as income.

Yash’s startup is more than welcoming to young talents from all over the world. The owner says any number of people can join the business to work online and earn money. Interested people can start working with them and they will guide you in your professional development. Social Matte Media is poised to revolutionize the advertising and marketing industry and we all know Yash won’t stop until he takes the business to new heights.


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Indiana Announces $ 540 Million Grant Program to Stabilize Child Care Industry | new https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/indiana-announces-540-million-grant-program-to-stabilize-child-care-industry-new/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 20:37:12 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/indiana-announces-540-million-grant-program-to-stabilize-child-care-industry-new/ Indiana Public Media News {“banners”: {“tv”: [ {“url” : “https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d”, “img” : “https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/8-29-21-wtiu-wicked-bnr.jpg”, “startingDate” : “1630209600000”, “endingDate” : “1630295940000”} , {“url” : “https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d”, “img” : “https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/8-15-21-wtiu-bnr.jpg”, “startingDate” : “1629000000000”, “endingDate” : “1629086340000”} , {“url” : “https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d”, “img” : “https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/8-16-21-wtiu-bnr.jpg”, “startingDate” : “1629086400000”, “endingDate” : “1629345540000”} , {“url” : “https://indianapublicmedia.secureallegiance.com/wtiu/WebModule/Donate.aspx?P=WTIUMCBNR&PAGETYPE=PLG&CHECK=2T6mTyo6yYuMn%2bAFYFwp%2bq1gzMC6uhq5nDjkJobrCdg%3d”, “img” : “https://indianapublicmedia.org/images/banner-images/8-19-21-wtiu-bnr.jpg”, “startingDate” : “1629345600000”, […]]]>

News Contact IPM News

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How the alcohol industry is influencing to block bailout policies – Croakey Health Media https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/how-the-alcohol-industry-is-influencing-to-block-bailout-policies-croakey-health-media/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 06:02:50 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/how-the-alcohol-industry-is-influencing-to-block-bailout-policies-croakey-health-media/ Introduction by Croakey: Industries use many strategies to block and undermine public health interventions. A new study highlights some long-standing lessons from tobacco control and clinical research on the impact of industry research funding. Researchers from the United Kingdom, reporting in the journal Social Sciences and Medicine, identified 60 systematic reviews published between 1996 and […]]]>

Introduction by Croakey: Industries use many strategies to block and undermine public health interventions. A new study highlights some long-standing lessons from tobacco control and clinical research on the impact of industry research funding.

Researchers from the United Kingdom, reporting in the journal Social Sciences and Medicine, identified 60 systematic reviews published between 1996 and 2020, with a total of 231 authors, which studied the effects of alcohol on heart health.

Fourteen of the reviews were undertaken by authors with a history of funding the alcohol industry, including five that were funded directly by the alcohol industry itself. All 14 such reviews found a cardioprotective effect of alcohol.

Among author reviews with no history of alcohol industry funding, results were mixed, with only 25 of these 46 reviews (54%) finding evidence of protective health effects.

The study also found other differences between journals with links to the alcohol industry and those with no such link. The authors said their findings underscore the importance of paying “attention to the actions of the alcohol industry to influence science.”

Media engagement is another well-used strategy for the industry, as pointed out a new study investigate why Sydney’s ‘lockout’ or ‘last drink’ laws were repealed despite doing exactly what they were designed to do: prevent alcohol-related harm from ending up in emergency services of our hospitals.

The study analyzed 445 print and online news articles on laws published between 2014 and 2020, identifying 435 stakeholders in the coverage, with industry sources most often mentioned.

Researchers from the Australian Prevention Partnership Center at the Sax Institute, Cancer Council NSW and the University of Sydney write below that “a concerted and effective media campaign by industry and political campaign groups” has been involved.

Health advocates and policymakers need to be aware of the ways in which industry groups can successfully use the media to influence governments and policy-making, write some of the study’s authors, Dr Elly Howse, Dr James Kite, Dr Christina Watts and Dr Bronwyn McGill.


Elly Howse, James Kite, Christina Watts and Bronwyn McGill write:

Sydney’s “lockout” or “last drink” laws have achieved exactly what they were designed to do: prevent alcohol-related harm from ending up in our hospital emergency departments. So why were they repealed?

Many of us who work in public health policy and research have discussed this issue over the past 18 months.

The available evidence suggests that the laws have been successful in reducing and preventing alcohol fueled violence, emergency room presentations, facial trauma and non-domestic assaults in central Sydney.

Ultimately, what ultimately led to a decline in public support and the eventual repeal of the laws was a concerted and effective media campaign by industry and political campaign groups.

Our analysis of the role played by the news media, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Review, contains important lessons for public health and prevention in general.

Our research suggests that it is not enough to demonstrate that a public health or prevention policy works in terms of health or social outcomes. This is especially the case when the policy is contested in the media and in the community at large, including by industry groups.

Policymakers and public health policy advocates need to tell a compelling story about impact beyond health, with stakeholder support for that narrative in the media.

The “last drinks” or “lock-out” laws

These laws were introduced in early 2014 by the New South Wales Coalition Government. They were introduced after community and media pressure to reduce alcohol-related violence and crime in central Sydney, especially after the tragic deaths of several young men.

The laws included ‘last drinks’ and ‘lockdown’ provisions for licensed premises in the CBD areas of Sydney and Kings Cross, where locations were to end alcohol service and refuse new customers after a certain time. of the night.

The laws were modeled after the very successful Newcastle laws, implemented in 2008 after similar problems with alcohol-related violence.

We performed an analysis of media coverage of Sydney’s latest drink laws between 2014 and 2020. We found that support for the laws changed significantly over that six-year period.

While media coverage of the laws was initially largely favorable, over time the media cited proportionately more people opposed to the laws than those who were in favor.

Indeed, the people cited who were opposed to the laws went from 47% of media coverage in 2014 to 73% in 2020 (Table 1).

We also analyzed 647 quotes from the most frequently cited stakeholders in the media, examining their main arguments for or against the laws.

Those who opposed the laws in the media included politicians and political leaders, hotel business owners, industry representatives and political campaign groups. These stakeholders referred to a wide variety of arguments and evidence regarding the impact of the laws, in particular the apparent impact on Sydney’s “night economy”.

For example, columnist Elizabeth Farrelly wrote: “if this continues, we won’t have a city. We’ll have a ring of dead suburbs by day around a dead CBD at night“.

The CEO of the Merivale hotel group, Justin Hemmes, drew up a picture of “a nocturnal ecosystem of restaurants, bars, retail, arts, live music and entertainment to draw people into the CBD at night ”.

Lord Mayor Clover Moore said the laws were “a sledgehammer to crack a nut“.

Industry stakeholders, a group that included bar and pub owners as well as industry lobby groups such as the Australian Hotels Association, were also much more likely to be mentioned and cited by the media. . These stakeholders rarely mentioned health outcomes – a finding that has been echoed in other public health research.

This research suggests that industry groups and stakeholders are diverting attention from the health impacts of their products or activities and questioning public health evidence, whether in alcohol policy, tobacco control or the taxation of sugary drinks.

There were far fewer quotes from individuals or groups expressing support for the laws. These supporters tended to focus on arguments related to crime, safety and health.

This is not surprising given that these stakeholders were representatives of health and physicians (such as local doctors), or NSW Premier Mike Baird, who was a public and vocal champion of laws and the importance of protecting the community from alcohol. related violence: “These laws relate to our moral obligation to protect the innocent from drunken violence.

Public support for the laws – although initially high – has also fluctuated.

As the opposition grew, the pressure on the government to repeal the laws also increased, notably from a major popular campaign that became a political party called “Keep Sydney Open”.

This style of public campaigning and lobbying has led to several surveys and reviews initiated by the government to examine the effectiveness and impact of laws. These reviews and inquiries also provided ample opportunity for submissions to the public and industry, which in turn increased media coverage of the issue.

Eventually, after increasingly negative media coverage and lobbying from various stakeholders, the NSW government pledged to repeal the laws in 2020 and 2021.

A success for the industry?

Our research indicates that opponents of the laws have been successful in using the media to influence public debate about the laws.

Reframing the problem, using campaign groups like Keep Sydney Open, and engaging in inquiries and public submissions have been the main ways opponents have made their voices heard in the media.

Our analysis also suggests that there is a complex relationship between media coverage, public support, and policy implementation.

Regulatory and law-based interventions to protect public health can be difficult to implement and maintain, especially when powerful industry groups oppose the regulation of their products.

We have seen it in other areas of public health, such as tobacco control. With the growing prominence given to opponents of the laws in the media, it is perhaps not surprising that the government has repealed the laws.

Key lessons for prevention

We believe our analysis has four main lessons for governments and advocates who wish to create and maintain preventive health policies, especially those that can be challenged by industry groups:

  1. Focus beyond the health impacts of interventions, using non-health arguments to defend policy
  2. Build a narrative that speaks to a large group of people and stakeholders
  3. Consider a range of outcomes affected by new policies and regulations, such as business and economic outcomes, or the possible impact on the performing arts and live music
  4. Be aware of the ways in which industry groups can successfully use the media to challenge and reject these policies.

We in public health also need to recognize that alcohol consumption in Australia and the policies governments are implementing to address the harm of alcohol are complex.

Political decisions are based on different values, beliefs and behaviors, which can be challenged by different groups and populations.

However, health advocates and policy makers need to be aware of the ways in which industry groups can successfully use the media to influence governments and policy making.

The case of Sydney’s “last drink” laws suggests that ultimately the industry won the political argument.

Authors

Authors, from L to R according to the details below

Dr Elly Howse is Research Director and Principal Investigator at the Australian Prevention Partnership Center, and Adjunct Researcher at the School of Public Health, University of Technology, Sydney.

Dr James Kite is Senior Lecturer in Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Sydney School of Public Health

Dr Christina Watts is a researcher, The Daffodil Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney

Dr Bronwyn McGill is Associate Researcher in Evidence for Policy and Practice, Sydney School of Public Health


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More local manufacturing being sent back to WA https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/more-local-manufacturing-being-sent-back-to-wa/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:32:09 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/more-local-manufacturing-being-sent-back-to-wa/ The McGowan Labor government has hailed Rio Tinto’s commitment to using local suppliers to build iron ore wagons for its Pilbara mining operations. Rio Tinto’s announcement includes an initial purchase commitment of 50 railcars of iron ore, followed by an ongoing commitment of 10 railcars of ore per year for at least the following five […]]]>

The McGowan Labor government has hailed Rio Tinto’s commitment to using local suppliers to build iron ore wagons for its Pilbara mining operations.

Rio Tinto’s announcement includes an initial purchase commitment of 50 railcars of iron ore, followed by an ongoing commitment of 10 railcars of ore per year for at least the following five years.

The announcement reflects the state government’s commitment to boosting local manufacturing and securing an ongoing pipeline of jobs in Western Australia through the establishment of the Ore Car Manufacture and Maintenance Action Group of iron.

The action group, of which Rio Tinto is a member, has been tasked with developing a competitive iron ore railcar manufacturing industry in Western Australia.

An independent pre-feasibility study, which was commissioned by the McGowan government, identified initiatives for the manufacture, refurbishment and maintenance of iron ore cars.

By supplying the iron ore industry with railcars and railcar components, the local steelmaking industry will support more jobs in Western Australia in the future.

The McGowan government is implementing its WA Jobs Plan and has created a $ 15 million local manufacturing investment fund to help existing businesses retool so they can build railcars and iron ore components , in accordance with an electoral commitment.

Former Minister of Emergency and Corrective Services Francis Logan has been appointed chairman of the Washington State government’s Railroad Car Manufacture and Maintenance Action Group.

Mr. Logan’s extensive and relevant experience brings to this role a strong commitment to working with industry to continue to create jobs for Western Australia.

The Action Group will continue the work of the pre-feasibility phase and guide the development of a comprehensive feasibility study on the viability of manufacturing and maintaining iron ore railcars and railcar components in Western Australia.

Keogh Bay People, a registered Indigenous business, has been rehired to deliver the full feasibility report which is expected to be delivered in the first half of 2022.

These initiatives build on the McGowan government’s electoral pledge to bring rail manufacturing back to the Midland area, which will result in the manufacture of 246 METRONET C-Series cars and six cars to replace existing Australind service.

This is the case with the new METRONET railcar installation in Bellevue, which was built with nearly 8,500 tonnes of WA steel and creates more than 200 long-term jobs.


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What investors saw in Ozy Media https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/what-investors-saw-in-ozy-media/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 03:39:16 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/what-investors-saw-in-ozy-media/ A recent analysis from social media measurement firm Tubular Labs suggests that Ozy has spent a lot to increase the views of the videos he posted to YouTube by paying to have his videos automatically show on screen. And even when Ozy came up with posts that his readers liked and shared in great numbers, […]]]>

A recent analysis from social media measurement firm Tubular Labs suggests that Ozy has spent a lot to increase the views of the videos he posted to YouTube by paying to have his videos automatically show on screen.

And even when Ozy came up with posts that his readers liked and shared in great numbers, he didn’t seem to try to replicate that success, according to a report from Garbage Day social media-focused newsletter. The articles that were widely shared were “articles on cookies, inspiring elephant stories and engaging fashion mini-docs,” the newsletter reported.

What was left, said a former employee with knowledge of the company’s analytics data, was an actual, albeit tiny, fanbase, but not the one Ozy liked to talk about. “Ozy’s classic demographic was a retired white teacher who used Ozy to stay young and awake and loved learning about the world,” the former employee said. Samir Rao, the company’s co-founder and COO, sometimes joked about using AARP as an advertiser, the former employee added.

Mr. Rao did not respond to a text message, and Mr. Watson denied the former employee’s claim. Ozy’s audience, he said, was “smart millennials and Gen X with a strong and growing dose of Gen Z.”

More generally, Mr. Watson took issue with a central challenge to his company’s claims: the idea that there was something misleading about presenting “The Carlos Watson Show” as a hit show when Ozy was in fact paying for it. views – effectively broadcasting its own programming. like an advertisement on YouTube.

Mr. Watson said that was not a problem. “Like all innovative companies (Netflix, Spotify, Tesla and more), we’ve definitely made a smart investment in marketing to make sure our top journalism and storytelling is presented to the right audience,” he said. “We didn’t just want to be subjected to the vagaries of algorithms, which is one of the many reasons Ozy appeals to advertisers.”

Now, investors and advertisers who have found validation in Ozy are leaving empty-handed. Employees are no longer paid. It was a sharp fall from a dream, promoted as recently as June to investors, according to a deck shared with me that said the company would be valued at $ 5 billion in 2025. (You could have bought from a valuation of only $ 450 million last summer.)


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Who defines “britishness” when it comes to television? Not people of color, that’s for sure | David Olusoga https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/who-defines-britishness-when-it-comes-to-television-not-people-of-color-thats-for-sure-david-olusoga/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 07:30:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/who-defines-britishness-when-it-comes-to-television-not-people-of-color-thats-for-sure-david-olusoga/ OOur television, as we like to remind ourselves and the rest of the world, is unique and uniquely British. Last month, former media minister John Whittingdale suggested that UK public service broadcasters – BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5 – might in the future be legally required to produce what he described as “quintessentially […]]]>

OOur television, as we like to remind ourselves and the rest of the world, is unique and uniquely British. Last month, former media minister John Whittingdale suggested that UK public service broadcasters – BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5 – might in the future be legally required to produce what he described as “quintessentially British” programs. Whittingdale quoted Only fools and horses, Downton abbey, The Great British Cake, Doctor Who, The bodyguard and Chip bag as examples of the kinds of programs that would pass his test.

This raises a lot of questions. First, if “britishness” were legally mandated, who could define and measure it and according to what criteria? Do shows like Idris Elba’s Luther, Michaela Coel’s I can destroy you and that of Steve McQueen Small Ax films, which explore the stories of black Britons – real and fictitious – not so “quintessentially British”?

The deeper question, however, is whether the UK television industry is capable of producing programs that reflect Britishness in all its diversity – socio-economic, regional, gender, sexual, generational and ethnic. The reasons for concern in this regard are that, behind the scenes and behind the camera, television has long struggled to build a workforce that resembles the nation it seeks to reflect.

These failures and their continued impact are taken into account in a report released last week by Ofcom, the industry regulator. Carried out over five years, it concludes that, despite some progress being made in some areas, most of the old problems, familiar to anyone familiar with the industry, remain. Women are more likely to quit television than to join it. People with disabilities are represented far from their population level of 19%. And while people of color and other minorities are recruited in increasing numbers, they remain clustered in subordinate positions and under-represented at senior and decision-making levels.

Because TV companies “have focused on recruiting newbies, there is still not enough diverse talent in leadership positions,” Ofcom director of broadcast policy Vikki Cook noted. . Referring to race and class, she called on the broadcasters and production companies that make many of their programs to “slow down the revolving door and focus on retaining and advancing talented people from all walks of life.” “.

The image of Ofcom is that of an industry in which the power to select which programs to run and how rests with senior executives and producers who largely belong to the middle class, able-bodied, white and very often men. A little different picture than the one I tried to describe last August when I gave the annual MacTaggart lecture at the Edinburgh TV festival. I then spoke about my experiences on television and those of people of color I have known who left the industry frustrated with the lack of opportunities for advancement and a culture unwilling to listen to their voices and their views.

What’s most depressing about this report is how familiar it is. Previous reports from previous decades say much the same thing. I guess part of this is because the industry has not fully accepted that the status quo is abnormal. All-white production teams based in London, a city with a 36% ethnic minority workforce, only seem acceptable because we have culturally normalized what is abnormal.

For decades, the industry has focused on programs that helped people of color walk through the doors of the industry, but offered no help to move them up. The Ofcom report describes the industry’s record in promoting people from diverse backgrounds as “dismal.”

Many people on television are apparently comfortable with young Blacks in junior positions, but uncomfortable with older Blacks in senior positions. I’ve heard that the industry’s diversity issues could be addressed by increasing the representation of young people, both on and off screen. Solve the problem of youth and you solve the problem of diversity, this argument says, as if darkness and youth are the same thing, which, as my creaky joints can attest, are not.

Similar cultural barriers limit the industry’s attempts to change its socio-economic makeup and throughout my career I have seen how women are often funneled into administrative rather than creative roles.

Trapped in the world it created, the failures of the past, delaying necessary changes in the present, the industry is finding that its growing determination to be more inclusive is not in itself enough to make the necessary changes.

What makes Ofcom’s findings even less surprising to me is that after my MacTaggart lecture, I learned that the experiences I had observed and had during my career were even more common than I was. didn’t think so. In the days following the conference, dozens of people of color sent me emails and social media messages about which this Ofcom report contains little that they had not learned. by first hand experience.

This year’s MacTaggart speaker, screenwriter Jack Thorne, gave a passionate speech on television’s equally blatant failure to include voices and build careers for people with disabilities. I suspect that after his lecture he too will have received a similar flurry of messages from people whose experiences resonated with his heartbreaking account of a state of mind often unable to recognize the talents of people with disabilities.

Changing the dial of diversity, in all its forms, is important in all industries, but television is special and especially important. Even in the age of streaming services, little is more widely shared in the UK than television. He still has an almost magical ability to bring the nation together for moments of shared cultural togetherness.

At best, it can allow us to recognize and empathize with one another across class and community divisions. Yet who gets to make television has never been shared the same, nor open to anyone with talents to develop and stories to tell.

Until this is resolved, programs that might pass the ‘distinctly British’ test of a politician risk being still British only in a narrow sense, unable to represent the full breadth of Britishness as it is. it really is in the 21st century.

David Olusoga is a historian and animator


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Tesla delivers record 241,300 vehicles in third quarter, beats analyst estimates https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/tesla-delivers-record-241300-vehicles-in-third-quarter-beats-analyst-estimates/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 16:03:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/tesla-delivers-record-241300-vehicles-in-third-quarter-beats-analyst-estimates/ The logo of automaker Tesla is seen at a dealership in London, Britain, May 14, 2021. REUTERS / Matthew Childs / File Photo Oct. 2 (Reuters) – Tesla Inc (TSLA.O) said on Saturday it delivered a record 241,300 electric cars in the third quarter, beating Wall Street estimates after chief executive Elon Musk asked staff […]]]>

The logo of automaker Tesla is seen at a dealership in London, Britain, May 14, 2021. REUTERS / Matthew Childs / File Photo

Oct. 2 (Reuters) – Tesla Inc (TSLA.O) said on Saturday it delivered a record 241,300 electric cars in the third quarter, beating Wall Street estimates after chief executive Elon Musk asked staff to “switch to super hardcore “to achieve the goals.

Analysts expected the electric car maker to deliver 229,242 vehicles, according to data from Refinitiv.

Tesla weathered the chip crisis better than its rivals, with overall shipments increasing 20% ​​between July and September from its previous high in the second quarter, marking the sixth consecutive quarter-over-quarter gain. .

In China, increased exports to Europe and the introduction of a cheaper Model Y have helped boost Tesla’s production, analysts say.

Musk had reported an extremely serious parts shortage at the electric car maker and urged employees to push deliveries to the end of the quarter, Reuters reported last month, citing an internal company email. [nL1N2QB2F3]

Tesla said it delivered 232,025 of its Model 3 compact cars and Model Y sport utility vehicles and 9,275 of its flagship Model S and Model X cars to customers during the quarter.

Total production in the third quarter increased by more than 15% to 237,823 vehicles from the previous quarter.

Reporting by Juby Babu and Nivedita Balu in Bengaluru and Hyunjoo Jin in SAN FRANCISCO Editing by Marguerita Choy

Our standards: Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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