Weather – Agri Turismo Denderacchi http://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/ Sat, 05 Jun 2021 02:31:35 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/cropped-agriturismo-32x32.png Weather – Agri Turismo Denderacchi http://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/ 32 32 Memorial weather delay imposes intimidating physical test on players https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/memorial-weather-delay-imposes-intimidating-physical-test-on-players/ Sat, 05 Jun 2021 00:45:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/memorial-weather-delay-imposes-intimidating-physical-test-on-players/ DUBLIN, Ohio – A game that’s widely seen as a mental exercise more than a physical test has reached the blue collar part of the season. After 31 holes in the heat and humidity at the Memorial on Friday, Branden Grace was done. “They say Monday is the longest day in golf, but try to […]]]>

DUBLIN, Ohio – A game that’s widely seen as a mental exercise more than a physical test has reached the blue collar part of the season.

After 31 holes in the heat and humidity at the Memorial on Friday, Branden Grace was done. “They say Monday is the longest day in golf, but try to play 31 holes around this place, it’s going to beat you up,” he said.

Grace is signed up to play the final qualifier for the US Open on Monday at her home club in South Florida, a 36-hole marathon that is widely regarded as the ultimate test in the game, but Friday was hardly a walk in the lush Jack Nicklaus park.

Due to storms that started and stopped and started and stopped play on day one, more than half of the field failed to complete the first round, forcing overtime on Friday.


Memorial tournament: open field scores | Full coverage


Moments after Grace finished her round, Joel Dahmen slumped against a wall after a 73 second round which could have been so much better without a collection of late mistakes. He wasn’t looking for excuses, but 33 holes a day is a loot.

“I’m not in great shape,” Dahmen smiles. “Facts are facts. I don’t know if i can go 33 [holes] then go 36 [on Monday] a few days later. I don’t have good cardio. I laughed in the scoring area and asked Louis [Oosthuizen], ‘Is that why the guys train on the Tour?’ This must be.”

Dahmen is also set to play Monday’s US Open qualifier here in Columbus, Ohio, which just adds to what has already been a long week.

Thanks to perfect weather on Friday, Muirfield Village officials will be back on schedule for round three, but that was little comfort for those who endured two wet days of rough, steep hills.

“I’m pretty tired. I woke up at 4.30am this morning and started my warm up and played 33 and this golf course is one of the toughest steps, ”said Patrick Cantlay, who walked off the course with a 67 in the second round for an 8- under the total.

BY Rex Hoggard

All day Friday at the Memorial, Bryson DeChambeau heard “Come on, Brooksie” screaming at him and he has “no problem” with that.

Beyond the cost of playing 33 holes, players also have to contend with this rough which every time makes offline an adventure. After the first round, Rory McIlroy suggested the rough was unfair, but that’s nothing new to Jack’s Place.

“It’s really brutal and it’s wet. The fairways are pretty generous, but if you don’t hit them the first hole is one of the hardest fairways to hit, ”said Dahmen. “The par 5 if you hit it in the rough you can put it back in play, but then I had a 5 iron today in the No. 7. I hit the driver and I didn’t could only cut it over 100 meters. “

While this may sound like a complaint, the truth is that the Memorial has long been considered one of the most demanding tests on the PGA Tour and a dramatic redesign of the course after last year’s tournament has not softened any from its edges, although Nicklaus had said so earlier. week, he thought that the course would play on a stroke easier.

Nicklaus’s prediction so far is almost perfect. Last year the average score was 74 moves and over 1 ¾ rounds this week the average is 72.92.

But that probably doesn’t inspire any of the players who woke up from 4 am for a marathon Friday or anyone unlucky enough to find the rough this week.

“When I was in the rough I had a few where you know you just grab it on the chin and go 100 yards, try to save a par or something from there, but it’s thick. ” said Grace.

Although the physical difficulty is very real, it is the mental toll that is the most difficult for the players. Cantlay said he spent Friday trying not to fall asleep on the course.

“We’ve been here for so long today that you might fall asleep a bit behind the wheel,” Cantlay said. “Just being aware of that and checking with yourself, are you as focused as possible, when you need to be, I think that’s the key.”

With Monday’s US Open qualifying looming for many, this is just the start of the most grueling part of professional golf.

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Portland Metro Weather Thursday: Sunny after light morning clouds; high 81 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/portland-metro-weather-thursday-sunny-after-light-morning-clouds-high-81/ Thu, 03 Jun 2021 13:10:02 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/portland-metro-weather-thursday-sunny-after-light-morning-clouds-high-81/ After the few clouds that moved into the valleys from the coast died down on Thursday, the day is expected to be mostly sunny with high temperatures cooling to around 81 degrees. We’re done, for now, with record high temperatures, as a system moving south from the Gulf of Alaska will bring increasing cloudiness and […]]]>

After the few clouds that moved into the valleys from the coast died down on Thursday, the day is expected to be mostly sunny with high temperatures cooling to around 81 degrees.

We’re done, for now, with record high temperatures, as a system moving south from the Gulf of Alaska will bring increasing cloudiness and light rain likely by Friday. evening.

The coast is already receiving moisture as the National Weather Service reports drizzle along the beaches, particularly north of Tillamook early Thursday.

The story is different in north central and central Oregon. These areas will be subject to fire weather monitoring due to high winds, low humidity and dry fuels later Friday morning until evening. Areas under surveillance include the northern Cascades of Oregon, the eastern slopes of the Cascades, parts of central Oregon, and the Lower Columbia Basin.

Sustained winds are expected to be 15-25 mph and gusts of 35 mph are likely. These conditions increase the risk of rapid fire growth on any new or existing fire. Anyone recreating outdoors should be very aware of the increased fire danger and consult with local authorities on the use of the campfire.

Portland can expect to see at least some precipitation starting late Friday night. It will be a sunny and clear day before clouds settle in later in the evening. The maximum will be close to 79 degrees. Rain is likely after around 23 hours

Most of southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon will see rain on Saturday. Showers are likely before around 11 a.m. The sky will remain mostly cloudy and the high temperatures will drop to around 68 degrees. This is more in line with seasonal averages. The average maximum for early June is 71 degrees.

Current long-range forecasts point to cool temperatures and continued rain at least until Monday.

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The seasonal weather continues https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/the-seasonal-weather-continues/ Wed, 02 Jun 2021 20:27:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/the-seasonal-weather-continues/ SYNOPSIS – The seasonal weather continues for the coming days. We will see partly cloudy skies each day with a possible stray downpour or thunderstorm. Look for highs on average close to 90 ° and lows close to 70 °. Chances of rain appear a bit higher for the start of next week. TONIGHT – […]]]>

SYNOPSIS – The seasonal weather continues for the coming days. We will see partly cloudy skies each day with a possible stray downpour or thunderstorm. Look for highs on average close to 90 ° and lows close to 70 °. Chances of rain appear a bit higher for the start of next week.

TONIGHT – Partly cloudy. Minimum near 69 °. Light winds from the SW.

TOMORROW – Partly sunny, PM showers possible. High near 90 °. SW winds at 5-10 mph.

TOMORROW EVENING – Partly cloudy. Low near 70 °. Light winds from the SW.

ENLARGED

FRI: Partly cloudy, isolated showers and thunderstorms. Low: 70 ° High: 89 ° 30%

SAT: Partly cloudy, isolated showers and thunderstorms. Low: 71 ° High: 90 ° 30%

SUN: Partly cloudy, isolated showers and thunderstorms. Low: 70 ° High: 88 ° 30%

MON: Partly sunny, scattered showers and thunderstorms. Low: 72 ° High: 87 ° 50%

MAR: Partly sunny, scattered showers and thunderstorms. Low: 71 ° High: 88 ° 40%

SEA: Partly cloudy, isolated showers and thunderstorms. Low: 71 ° High: 91 ° 30%

COASTAL FORECAST THURSDAY – Light cut on lakes and coastal bays. SW winds at 10 kts. Seas off 1 to 2 feet.

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Hard rain to come as the weather warms up https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/hard-rain-to-come-as-the-weather-warms-up/ Tue, 01 Jun 2021 23:26:27 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/hard-rain-to-come-as-the-weather-warms-up/ ROCKFORD (WREX) – The weather gets warmer at the end of the week, but this may be the only change we’re seeing. A long period of dry, sunny weather can set in with the heat, meaning beneficial rains stay away a little longer. Heat: Temperatures remain near average on Wednesday, then heat up to nearly […]]]>

ROCKFORD (WREX) – The weather gets warmer at the end of the week, but this may be the only change we’re seeing. A long period of dry, sunny weather can set in with the heat, meaning beneficial rains stay away a little longer.

Heat:

Temperatures remain near average on Wednesday, then heat up to nearly 90 degrees on weekends. We haven’t had a day in the 90s yet this year, but we’ve come close once or twice.

Mid-week, look for temperatures around 80 degrees Wednesday afternoon. Just like Tuesday, look for plenty of sun, low humidity, and a light breeze. Thursday enters the 80s, when conditions do not change otherwise.

The heat rises by Friday and peaks this weekend.

Friday is when the heat begins to build up. Temperatures are heating up in the 1980s, placing us almost 10 degrees above average. Saturday and Sunday bring the heat, one or two degrees near 90 degrees. It could be our early days in the 90s in some places.

Sunny weather remains in play throughout the weekend so no changes are coming there. The humidity rises a little, but not to the point that the air is heavy.

Rain needed:

The weather can remain sunny and dry throughout the week, with rain not likely to arrive until next Monday.

While it is easy to plan for sunny and warm weather, we could really enjoy a rainy period. It might not happen until next week.

An active model could be put in place from Monday. For now, the pattern doesn’t look completely soggy, as showers and storms can be scattered instead.

This active pattern could continue at least Thursday. As mentioned above, don’t plan for a washout as there is a lot of dry weather between scattered showers.

The risk of rain does not retain the heat. We can stay near 90 degrees throughout the next week. As the active model kicks in, the humidity continues to climb, so conditions can look sweltering by the middle of next week.

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Weather Service issues heat advisory for Walla Walla Valley and beyond | New https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/weather-service-issues-heat-advisory-for-walla-walla-valley-and-beyond-new/ Tue, 01 Jun 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/weather-service-issues-heat-advisory-for-walla-walla-valley-and-beyond-new/ After one of the driest April on record, the Walla Walla Valley is now in a heatwave this week with “extremely hot” temperatures possible, weather officials said – and it’s not even there yet. ‘summer. The Pendleton National Weather Service had forecast a heat wave since last week, but on Monday, May 31, the service […]]]>

After one of the driest April on record, the Walla Walla Valley is now in a heatwave this week with “extremely hot” temperatures possible, weather officials said – and it’s not even there yet. ‘summer.

The Pendleton National Weather Service had forecast a heat wave since last week, but on Monday, May 31, the service officially issued a heat advisory from 11 a.m. Tuesday to 8 p.m. Wednesday for much of the area.

High temperatures are expected to range from 95 to 102 degrees, forecasters reported.

The heat wave is expected to hit the entire Lower Columbia Basin, including the Greater Dayton, Walla Walla, Milton-Freewater, and Tri-Cities areas.

“Drink plenty of fluids,” the NWS advisory says. “Young children and pets should never be left unattended in vehicles.”

Weather officials have warned to take extra precautions if people plan to be outdoors Tuesday and Wednesday and limit strenuous activities in the early mornings and evenings to reduce the chance of heat exhaustion or heat exhaustion. heatstroke.

Wednesday is expected to be the hottest day of this week, with a high of 100 forecast for Walla Walla.

According to the NWS, the record temperature for June 1 in Walla Walla is 98 degrees, set in 1986, and June 2 also reached 98 degrees in 2007.

Meanwhile, the Walla Walla region is currently the subject of a drought advisory from the State Department of Ecology.

Droughts have five levels in the agency’s system: abnormally dry, moderate, severe, extreme and exceptional.

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Today’s weather forecast saves the holiday weekend | New https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/todays-weather-forecast-saves-the-holiday-weekend-new/ Mon, 31 May 2021 04:02:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/todays-weather-forecast-saves-the-holiday-weekend-new/ STATE COLLEGE – A meteorologist said temperatures today are expected to be considerably warmer than Saturday and Sunday, putting a stamp on the Memorial Day holiday, the unofficial start of summer. Compared to Sunday, it will be much better today, said Max Gawryla of AccuWeather at State College. It won’t look like summer yet, he […]]]>

STATE COLLEGE – A meteorologist said temperatures today are expected to be considerably warmer than Saturday and Sunday, putting a stamp on the Memorial Day holiday, the unofficial start of summer.

Compared to Sunday, it will be much better today, said Max Gawryla of AccuWeather at State College.

It won’t look like summer yet, he said, but temperatures in central Pennsylvania are expected to be in the 70s.

Gawryla said the high temperature in the Susquehanna Valley will be 73. “There will be sunny skies and it will generally be nicer,” he said.

“It will be nice to be outside for a barbecue.”

Over the weekend, cold rain and temperatures in the 1950s kept people away from area parks – except for the hearty joggers outside in their hoodies at Shikellamy State Park, Hufnagle Park. and Milton State Park.

During the remainder of this week, temperatures will reach the 70s.

AccuWeather’s long-range forecast has warm weather, with highs between the mid to high 80s moving early next week.

Daytime highs in the ’80s will continue through June, with most nightly lows expected to remain in the’ 60s, according to the long-term forecast released by AccuWeather.

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Warm, sunny weather in store for Memorial Day week https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/warm-sunny-weather-in-store-for-memorial-day-week/ Sun, 30 May 2021 03:25:35 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/warm-sunny-weather-in-store-for-memorial-day-week/ Posted: May 29, 2021 / 10:25 p.m. CDT / Update: May 29, 2021 / 10:25 p.m. CDT The weekend started off with a few passing clouds and a few showers, although with the Great Dew Point Low in western North Dakota most of those showers do not reach the surface. As temperatures cool this evening, […]]]>

Posted:
Update:

The weekend started off with a few passing clouds and a few showers, although with the Great Dew Point Low in western North Dakota most of those showers do not reach the surface. As temperatures cool this evening, the likelihood of these showers reaching the ground will increase. Most of the chances will be in central North Dakota.

These showers can produce a rumble or two of thunder, but will dissipate in the early hours of Sunday morning.

High pressure will build up in the area, minimizing cloud cover. Temperatures are expected to dip into the 1940s, with even a few higher 30s possible for Saturday night. Areas that see rain and thunderstorms will stay a bit warmer.

Memorial Day appears to be in the 1970s and in predominantly sunny conditions as this center of high pressure will remain above our forecast area. Windy conditions will be the story of the middle of the week before the weekend.

Tuesday will be partly cloudy to mostly sunny, but there will be a risk of showers and thunderstorms throughout the day.

Temperatures throughout the week will continue to warm. The Climate Prediction Center predicts a very high chance that southern North Dakota will experience well above average temperatures over the next 6-10 days.

Temperatures by the weekend are expected to be near the 90s.

-Meteorologist Mike Dandrea

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How to make sure you’re ready https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/how-to-make-sure-youre-ready/ Sat, 29 May 2021 12:00:18 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/how-to-make-sure-youre-ready/ With Colorado’s inclement weather season well underway, there’s no better time than now to prepare for severe storms. Here in Colorado, we are no strangers to the extreme and unusual weather conditions that occur at any time of the year. From blizzards and flash floods to forest fires and tornadoes, we all get them. But […]]]>

With Colorado’s inclement weather season well underway, there’s no better time than now to prepare for severe storms. Here in Colorado, we are no strangers to the extreme and unusual weather conditions that occur at any time of the year. From blizzards and flash floods to forest fires and tornadoes, we all get them. But right now, in May, June, July and August, severe storms that carry hail, high winds and sometimes tornadoes tend to sweep through our landscapes more frequently.

If you were here for the billion dollar hail disaster in May 2017, you know that hail and severe storms are no joke and can quickly get expensive. Lightning strikes and flash floods from severe storms are some of Colorado’s deadliest types of weather, and destructive winds can cause a huge problem for anyone in their path.

To avoid any unexpected severe storm trauma, the best thing you can do is prepare for any severe weather that we may encounter in Colorado in the spring and summer.

To understand threats, you need to understand forecasts. The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) based in Norman, Okla., Monitors severe storms and publishes a daily threat-based forecast. These range from a general risk of afternoon storms to a “high” risk of damaging storms hitting an area.

At the start of a severe weather day, these threat levels will likely be the first thing you see in a morning forecast. The areas exposed to these risks are generally quite large and can cover several states.

Then come the watches and warnings. A watch, which can be a severe storm watch or a tornado watch, means “beware” of possible severe storms. When these “watches” are issued, they typically include a smaller, more refined area, equivalent to half the size of the state of Colorado, such as the Eastern Plains.

A severe thunderstorm or tornado “warning” is very localized and typically includes parts of counties that are about to be struck by a severe thunderstorm or tornado. Having a way to be alerted to these types of warnings is essential during inclement weather season. Use a NOAA weather radio or the FEMA app to receive these alerts quickly. Most “warnings” will be sent to your phone as a Wireless Emergency Alert (WEA) if your location at that time is in the threat zone.

Tornadoes

The threat of a tornado in Colorado increases in May and continues through August. Ninety percent of Colorado’s tornadoes occur during that four-month period, but tornadoes have been reported as early as February and through November. According to the NWS, on average Colorado experiences 53 tornadoes per year and they have occurred in most areas of the state, but historically 95% of tornadoes occur along and east of Interstate 25. where heat and humidity in the lower atmosphere are often more abundant. . Tornadoes can occur at any time of the day, but most occur between 1 p.m. and 8 p.m.

An easy phrase to remember for tornado safety is “get in, get down and cover yourself”. Enter a sturdy building, descend to the lowest floor or most interior rooms, and cover your head. The best option for tornado safety is to be inside a well-built structure in a basement, safe room, or underground storm shelter. If neither of these options are available, move to a hallway or small interior room on the lowest level, such as a closet or bathroom. A room without windows is preferable.

Flash floods

In case of flooding turn around, don't drown - NWS chart
NWS chart

Flash floods refer to a sudden and dangerous rise in water along a stream, river, or area of ​​normally dry land. Flash floods can occur within minutes or hours and can travel at surprisingly high speeds, hitting with little warning. These types of events are quite destructive due to the force of moving water and accumulating debris, such as trees and rocks, which can destroy roads, bridges, and buildings.

Burn scars from forest fires are a complication of flash flood forecasting. Heavy rains on burn scars, even for a brief period of time, can cause flash floods and debris flows. Burn scars pose a higher risk of flooding for up to five years after a forest fire. Residents in and near burned areas should plan in advance for flood response. Almost half of all flash flood deaths are vehicle-related – don’t enter a flooded roadway, instead, ‘turn around, don’t drown’. In rapidly rising waters, backing away from the water may be safer. One or two feet of water will wash away most vehicles, and you also can’t tell if the road is damaged under moving water.

Greet

Bethune, CO Hailstone - Photo by the NWS
Photo provided by an employee of the NWS

Hail often occurs in Colorado. Hail forms in storms while liquid water freezes in the middle and upper cold levels of storms. Hailstones are kept aloft by strong upward winds for some time, then fall to the ground. In Colorado, hailstones range from the size of a pea, about 3/8 inch in diameter, to the size of a softball, about 4 1/2 inches in diameter. State record hail fell on Bethune on August 13, 2019. Measuring 4.38 inches, it had a circumference of almost 13 inches and weighed over half a pound.

Hailstones can cause enormous damage to crops, either as large hailstones or as a build-up of large numbers of small hailstones to a depth of several inches. If you find yourself outside in a hailstorm, the first thing to do is to immediately take shelter in the way you can. Hailstones can fall to the ground at speeds of 40 to 100 km / h and can be the size of a tennis ball or a soft ball, and something of this magnitude flying towards the ground can cause injury to humans. and animals. Parking your car under some sort of blanket will help minimize damage to your vehicle, but hail is rather difficult to predict, especially where large damaging hail will fall, so preparing for severe storms, in general, is the way to go. best way to compensate for any unforeseen events. met.

Lightning

Lightning typically kills and injures more people in Colorado than any other thunderstorm hazard. Looking at National Weather Service lightning data from 1980 to 2019, lightning killed 99 people and injured 485 people in Colorado.

Colorado Lightning Victims - NWS Colorado Lightning Resource Page
NWS Colorado Lightning Resource Page

Lightning also ignites most forest and range fires in the Centennial State. Many of these forest fires occur when lightning is generated by thunderstorms that produce little or no precipitation. This type of lightning is called dry lightning.

The safest thing for you to do, if you are outside and lightning or thunder begins to occur, is to immediately enter inside a fully enclosed building such as a house, a business or a church. Cars and trucks with metal roofs also provide excellent lightning protection. Once inside, keep all windows and doors closed and do not touch any metal inside the vehicle. It is recommended to wait at least 30 minutes after the last roar of thunder before returning outside.

As the inclement weather season continues, remember to take these threats seriously and always know the forecast before you set out to explore our wonderful state. Afternoon thunderstorms are almost a guarantee during the summer months and those caught outdoors hiking or enjoying the water can find themselves in a strong or severe storm that can result in multiple dangers and being prepared for them is a good way to insure yourself. stay safe and ready.

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Lake Perry expects a great weekend, despite the weather https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/lake-perry-expects-a-great-weekend-despite-the-weather/ Sat, 29 May 2021 00:17:23 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/lake-perry-expects-a-great-weekend-despite-the-weather/ TOPEKA (KSNT) – It’s called the unofficial summer kickoff, but it doesn’t feel like that this weekend. Lake Perry officials said it had been a while since water levels had been this good for Memorial Day weekend, so people are coming to enjoy it all even with the colder weather. “I like going out earlier […]]]>

TOPEKA (KSNT) – It’s called the unofficial summer kickoff, but it doesn’t feel like that this weekend.

Lake Perry officials said it had been a while since water levels had been this good for Memorial Day weekend, so people are coming to enjoy it all even with the colder weather.

“I like going out earlier this summer because there are no boats there,” said Logan Dinges.

Dinges, from Lawrence, finished his school year on Thursday. He and his family are already getting into the summer vibe, trying to beat the Memorial Day crowds, putting their boat on Friday afternoon. Dinges and his brother have wetsuits to keep warm while they wake up in a board and tube.

“I think it’s a lot of fun doing all water sports,” said Dinges.

But recent rains have worried lake officials that going out on the lake might not be an option.

“It was just raining hard, heavy, heavy, and it was like, I’m just laying in my bed, oh my god we’re probably going to be inundated,” said Michelle Campbell, director of Perry State Park.

While it varies among lakes in the state, Perry is right about where Campbell would like it to be.

“This is the first time in maybe five years that we haven’t been inundated at the Perry State Park boat ramps, it’s been so long,” she said.

When it comes to camping, the national park is at full capacity for its utility sites for campers. Officials therefore expect the next busy days.

“It’s going to start out to be a good weekend, it’s going to be a little chilly, different from the previous years because we’re talking about highs in the 60s, and the nights are going to be in the 40s, so people are going to snuggle up. around their campfires. I urge people to bring lots of firewood, ”Campbell said. “I think they are going to take advantage of it, they are going to have a great weekend.”

At Lake Perry, tent camping is on a first come, first served basis, but if you are in a motorhome and cannot make it to the lake this weekend because places are full, managers recommend that you reserve a place for a few weeks. in advance if it is not a public holiday.

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Ball State students take a close look at extreme weather conditions in storm chasing class https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/ball-state-students-take-a-close-look-at-extreme-weather-conditions-in-storm-chasing-class/ Fri, 28 May 2021 04:44:00 +0000 https://agriturismo-denderacchi.com/ball-state-students-take-a-close-look-at-extreme-weather-conditions-in-storm-chasing-class/ A small group of students gain real-world experience as they chase storms across the Great Plains. INDIANAPOLIS – A group of Ball State students share their experience hunting storms in the Great Plains. Students set off on an unforgettable journey, studying the atmosphere, forecasting inclement weather and chasing storms. “So far we’ve seen at least […]]]>

A small group of students gain real-world experience as they chase storms across the Great Plains.

INDIANAPOLIS – A group of Ball State students share their experience hunting storms in the Great Plains.

Students set off on an unforgettable journey, studying the atmosphere, forecasting inclement weather and chasing storms.

“So far we’ve seen at least five tornadoes, but the biggest yesterday was either the EF2 or EF3 lineup in Kansas,” said college student Rachel Wynalda.

Wynalda is one of a small group of students led by Ball State Associate Professor of Meteorology Dr. Dave Call.

“I’m proud of the fact that this is a chase class and not a chase tour,” Call said.

This is his fourteenth time as the head of the storm chasing class.

“Understanding what the radar is really showing you, storms, is essential,” Call said. “So on this trip we have the radar in the vehicles, we have it on the iPad while we’re out there watching the storms, and it allows us, you know, to really make those connections between how storms work. and what we can see on the radar. “

These forecasts can save lives and you can tell these students have a real passion for the weather.

“I got mine from my dad, actually. He likes storms too and even yesterday when we were watching the tornado … I gave him a quick FaceTime call and just showed him the tornado,” Wynalda said.

RELATED: The Weathering Season Is Here. Are you ready?

“You can look at all the data and everything, but at the end of the day you have to be prepared for anything, because the weather is very unpredictable and I feel like the more we are here, the more storms there are. we hunt, we learn more about trends and things that can help us, for example, better identify storms and protect people, ”said student Alexander Duffus.

Duffus is another student in pursuit and his passion comes from wanting to protect people.

“I don’t think anyone should die for much more,” he said. “So anyway I can help the meteorology field and how to protect people, I want to do it.”

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